Braze Welding Techniques

Welding


Welding

LEARN THE ART OF WELDING FROM THE GROUND UP

Filled with step-by-step instructions and detailed illustrations, Welding, Second Edition provides an easy-to-follow introduction to oxyacetylene welding and cutting, soldering, and basic metal properties. You''ll learn how to set up your workshop, properly use welding equipment, design projects, work safely, and get professional results–even if you have no experience. With coverage of the latest tools, materials, and techniques, this fully updated, hands-on guide serves as an ideal beginner''s tutorial as well as an on-the-job reference for experienced welders.

Find out how to:

Work with oxyacetylene welding fuels, equipment, and supplies

Review other welding methods, including arc, tungsten inert gas, and gas metal arc welding

Understand the properties and weldability of various metals

Use the latest soldering tools and techniques

Master brazing, braze welding, cutting metal, and welding thicker metals

Follow welding safety procedures and troubleshoot problems

Test your knowledge with end-of-chapter review questions

Design and set up your own home workshop

Build metal projects, including a gate, fireplace grate, and workbench

$44.95

Soldering, Brazing & Welding: A Manual Of Techniques


Soldering, Brazing & Welding: A Manual Of Techniques

Soldering, Brazing & Welding is an ideal manual for anyone requiring comprehensive advice and instruction in these common forms of metalwork. Their applications are now increasingly widespread in the craft of metalwork, as well as more traditionally in light industry. Topics covered include procedure for making a soldering joint; selecting consumables and heat source for silver soldering; typical braze welding techniques and applications; oxy-acetylene equipment, setting up, and fusion welding; and MIG, TIG, and manual metal arc welding.

$41.95

Soldering, Brazing & Welding: A Manual of Techniques


Soldering, Brazing & Welding: A Manual of Techniques

"Soldering, Brazing & Welding" is an ideal manual for anyone requiring comprehensive advice and instruction in these common forms of metalwork. Their applications are now increasingly widespread in the craft of metalwork, as well as more traditionally in light industry. Topics covered include procedure for making a soldering joint; selecting consumables and heat source for silver soldering; typical braze welding techniques and applications; oxy-acetylene equipment, setting up, and fusion welding; and MIG, TIG, and manual metal arc welding.

$28.93

Uniweld Type17-5 Weld/Braze Tip - Welding & Cutter Accessories


Uniweld Type17-5 Weld/Braze Tip – Welding & Cutter Accessories

Uniweld Type17-5 Weld/Braze Tip – Uniweld Type17-5 Weld/braze Tip Can Be Used With Acetylene, Propane, Map//pro, And Natural Gas. Capable Of Welding 1/4″ To 1/2″ Of Metal, And Brazing 3″ Of Copper. Tip Elbow Is Copper, Mixer And Nut Are Brass. Has Two O-ring Seals So Tip Nut Only Needs To Be Firmly Hand Tightened. Tip Will Fit Either The 71 Or Wh550 Welding Handle.

$64.71

braze welding techniques
Welding Safety, Equipment, Tips & Techniques : Handling Gas Cylinders Safely When Welding

We are living in a world where everything is constantly changing. Science, technology, and medicine are constantly advancing, and the internet has changed the way society shops, communicates, and even educates their youth. There are even incredible advances in industries that are typically very opposed to change. The woodworking tool industry is one such industry.

Recent advances in cutting material has revolutionized the way this industry now builds their tools. At one time a saw shop had to spend a great deal of time, money and resources making frequent stops in production to sharpen and re-tip their saw blades, but a new material for woodworking tools tremendously helps to reduce this down-time. Cermet and Cermet II are advanced grades of Carbide that are more wear resistant, more resistant to breakage, allow tools to work at faster cutting speeds, and stay cool, even at high temperatures. The Cermet material has undergone many changes and many advances to adapt it into woodworking and tooling applications.

Cermets have been proven for decades in metal machining. Cermets were tried in saws about ten years ago and did not work well because no one could keep the tips on. Carbide Processors pioneered new brazing techniques and with their hardwork and U.S. patent 6,322,871 were finally able to apply Cermet technology to woodworking and saw tipping. The Cermets are composed entirely of TiC (Titanium Carbide) and TiN (Titanium Nitride). Tungsten carbides usually have (TiC and TiN) coatings to improve tool life and resist built-up edge. After this thin coating wears away then the insert’s usefulness ends. A cermet is not coated instead it is solid coating material. Since a cermet is a solid composition of (TiC) and/or (TiN), wear is much more gradual – thus the advantage of having a solid substrate. Although the US Patent Office accepts this as a ceramic it is best here to consider it as an intermediate grade between tungsten carbide and pure ceramics. It has a lot of the good qualities of true ceramics as well as an acceptable transverse rupture strength of over 200,000 psi.

Cermets are one of the best kept secrets in the cutting tool industry. They provide the user with increased productivity and profitability through higher cutting speeds and extended tool life. Cermets bridge the gap between ceramics and carbides with speeds ranging from (300 -1200 s.f.m.). They also provide excellent chip control with molded or ground chipbreakers. Carbide Processors was an industry leader in using this revolutionary material for cutting tools. They now make their own line of Cermet tipped saw blades [http://www.carbideprocessors.com/longlifead.htm], and can make any custom tool with this highly durable material.

braze welding techniques

How do you braze weld?



IS there a certain technique to braze welding? do you make the circular pattern like you do when gas welding and fillet welding? somebody help

not really man, just balance ur torch like u were taught. thats critical and the other thing is its not like welding, no “technique” is really required as far as weaving or circular patterns cause it all just flowes together anyways. what u need to watch for is called “tinning” where ur puddle will flow up just a little bit ahead of ur main puddle, it almost sucks ahead a little bit, then its time to add filler rod to that tinning puddle thats how u know u have the right heat in there and weld progression.
braze welding is BS anyways man, i was good at it in school but i dont really have the patients for it for any lenth of time. but thats how u do it. peace..

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